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Come to Cheshire Woodlands for your management plan and make the difference with timely, low-cost management interventions in Stockport to assure the long-term value and continuity of your tree or woodland asset.

photograph - forest plantationWhether you require a management plan, timber valuation, ecological management, disabled access or cycle tracks, Cheshire Woodlands can provide the expertise.

In recent years, a combination of factors has produced a shift in emphasis in woodland management from timber production to a multi-benefit approach with an increased awareness of wildlife conservation, public access and leisure provision.

Take a look at our 'Tree Risk Management' section to see how Quantified Tree Risk Assessment can help you to manage public access and nature conservation while at the same time discharging your duty of care for safety in your woodlands.

About Stockport

Stockport is a large town in Greater Manchester. It lies on elevated ground 6 miles southeast of Manchester city centre, at the point where the rivers Goyt and Tame merge to create the River Mersey.

Historically, most of the town was in Cheshire, but the area to the north of the Mersey was in Lancashire. Stockport in the 16th century was a small town entirely on the south bank of the Mersey, and known for the cultivation of hemp and rope manufacture. In the 18th century the town had one of the first silk factories in the Britain but Stockport's maint industries of the 19th century were the cotton and allied industries. Stockport was also at the centre of the country's hatting industry, which by 1884 was exporting more than six million hats a year. The last hat works in Stockport closed in 1997.

Stockport is located on Permian sandstones and red Triassic sandstones and mudstones, mantled by thick deposits of till and pockets of sand and gravel deposited by glaciers at the end of the last glacial period, some 15,000 years ago. To the east is the Red Rock fault, and the older rocks from the Upper Carboniferous period surface. An outcrop of Coal Measures extends southwards down through Tameside and into Hazel Grove. To the east, the sandstones and shales of Millstone Grit are present as outcrops on the upland moors of Dark Peak and South Pennines, and to the south, are the limestones of the White Peak.

Information courtesy of Wikipedia, licenced under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike licence.